Tick’s Bite May Trigger Meat Allergy; Tick Found Further North

A new, aggressive type of tick is spreading and may make the summer much less pleasant. One bite of this tick may trigger a meat allergy.

According to news reports, the lone star tick, commonly found in southeastern and south central areas of the United States has been spreading north and has been found as far north as Minnesota and New Hampshire.

The tick, which has a white dot on adult females triggers a meat allergy.

After a bite from the lone star tick, a person may develop hives, shortness of breath, anaphylaxis or even death after the person eats pork, beef, lamb or any other mammalian meat. A specific sugar called alpha-gal, which is in those mammalian meats trigger the allergic reaction.

The allergic reaction tends to not appear until somewhere between three hours and 10 to 12 hours after receiving the bite. Unfortunately, the symptoms can be quite severe and seem to appear out of the blue.

This tick-related allergy is very new, so new in fact that no government agency has published collected data regarding it. Experts say the allergy does appear to fade over time and not be life long, but additional tick bites may retrigger the allergic response.

You can  help reduce the tick populations in your yard by following Centers for Disease Control recommendations. First of all, make sure to remove leaf litter. Clear tall grasses and brush around home and at the edge of lawns. It is helpful to place a 3-foot wide barrier of wood chips or gravel between lawns and wooded areas to limit ticks migrating to recreational areas.

Mow the lawn regularly and keep playground equipment, decks and patios away from the yard edges and trees. When you stack your wood, make sure to stack it neatly and in a dry area.

Remove any old furniture or trash from the yard that may give ticks a place to hide. Finally, discouraging larger unwelcome animals from entering your yard by constructing a fence.

If you are experiencing any type of pest issues, it is imperative to speak with our experts for a free consultation today.

 

 

 

 

Deadly Tick-Born Virus, Powassan Virus, Emerging

A relatively new and rare tick-borne disease is popping up where ticks are found­. The potentially life-threatening virus, Powassan virus, is carried and transmitted by three types of ticks. With the warmer winter, the tick population continues to increase and concerns grow.

While a tick must be attached for at least 24 hours typically to transmit Lyme disease, health experts are warning that this virus can be transmitted much faster.

Many infected with Powassan virus do not develop any symptoms, and the intubation period lasts from one week to one month. Unfortunately, for those who do, the effects can be deadly. The virus can infect the central nervous symptoms, causing encephalitis and meningitis. Symptoms of infection tend to be “flu-like” and include fever, headache, vomiting, weakness, confusion, loss of coordination, speech difficulties and seizures.

Obviously, it is best to try to prevent ticks from biting you. Try wearing long sleeves and pants when able and use insect repellant. Make sure to conduct thorough tick checks after being outdoors as well. If you find a tick, remove it as soon as possible.

You can also help reduce the tick populations in your yard by following Centers for Disease Control recommendations. First of all, make sure to remove leaf litter. Clear tall grasses and brush around home and at the edge of lawns. It is helpful to place a 3-foot wide barrier of wood chips or gravel between lawns and wooded areas to limit ticks migrating to recreational areas.

Mow the lawn regularly and keep playground equipment, decks and patios away from the yard edges and trees. When you stack your wood, make sure to stack it neatly and in a dry area.

Remove any old furniture or trash from the yard that may give ticks a place to hide. Finally, discouraging larger unwelcome animals from entering your yard by constructing a fence.

If you are experiencing any type of pest issues, it is crucial to speak with our experts for a free consultation today.

Find out more about the Powassan Virus on the CDC site.

 

 

 

 

Abnormally Warm Spring & Winter Will Bring Increased Pests

Graphic From: National Pest Management Association

The warmer temperatures across the region with sporadic extreme winter weather coupled with an abnormally warm spring may give tick and mosquito populations an early boost in the Midwest this year. Those along with early termite swarms, may create bigger-than-normal pest populations, according to the annual spring Bug Barometer report forecasted by the National Pest Management Association.

With the forecasted abnormally warm spring and the mild winter temperatures across most the United States, pest populations are expected to thriven the months ahead. The NPMA forecasts that dry spring and summer weather will bring increased ant activity around homes earlier than usual and the warmer weather will cause mosquito eggs to hatch sooner.

You can help protect your home by taking preventative actions now. As your local pest control company in St. Louis with more than 30 years of pest control experience, ASAP is committed to providing you with professional, effective pest control, termite control and wildlife removal services at affordable prices.

We offer free inspections, 10 percent off to new customers and $25 off for current customers who refer a friend.

Our experts can come to your home and inspect to identify any problem and potential problem areas. We will come up with a plan that fits both your needs and your budget.

In the meantime, you can take other steps to help protect your home. No one should have to spend the summer fighting unwanted visitors! Call today for your free consultation.

Preventing Ticks And Lyme Disease

Sometimes we may become numb to the news about ticks and Lyme disease because we hear about it often. Unfortunately, as the weather warms, the problem with ticks may continue to grow.

The Centers for Disease Control said ticks are actually born pathogen free, but because they feed on blood, they often quickly become carriers. All it takes is for the tick to feed on an animal infected with the disease and then feed on a person to pass a disease like Lyme along easily. However, a tick must feed on its host for several hours to actively transmit the disease, so there is a window of time before you can become infected.

It is crucial to make sure to regularly check yourself if you’ve been outside and use a DEET-based insect repellent to help repel any ticks before heading out. If you find a tick, you will want to carefully remove it with a fine point tweezers.

Since the winter has been mild, it is important to take steps toward reducing the tick population near your home and in your yard in an effort to keep your family healthy.

The Centers for Disease Control have several recommendations to help reduce ticks in your yard.

First of all, make sure to remove leaf litter. Clear tall grasses and brush around home and at the edge of lawns. It is helpful to place a 3-foot wide barrier of wood chips or gravel between lawns and wooded areas to limit ticks migrating to recreational areas.

Mow the lawn regularly and keep playground equipment, decks and patios away from the yard edges and trees. When you stack your wood, make sure to stack it neatly and in a dry area.

Remove any old furniture or trash from the yard that may give ticks a place to hide. Finally, discouraging larger unwelcome animals from entering your yard by constructing a fence.

If you are experiencing any type of pest issues, it is crucial to speak with our experts for a free consultation today.